Tag: dogparkour

Bullet journal in a Filofax continued

Bullet journal in a Filofax continued

After trying my Filofax for a few weeks, I find myself adding little bits to it. It’s so practical!

for this week, I used a template and printed.

Next section is my master task list, that has moved out of its notebook and into here. super-easy to change places and just take out finished projects.

And also super-easy to add pages! This is the planning of my online dog parkour class (swedish). I needed some more space – I added an extra page.

In section nr 3 I keep my photography clients, and I have a diagram that makes sure I remember everything in my workflow.

Section 4: dog training! I’m going to try everything in one book! Let’s see how it goes…:D

My weekly plan

List of criteria for each thing I want to train

And today’s training.

Templates from my Creative Kelpie shop, Glädjeklick for Swedish and Etsy for English version.

When I have much to do and don’t want to think, I find that the printables are a life saver…When I designed them my mind actually worked! 🙂

I’ll keep you posted on how it works out, what I invent, what I change. And if I get bored…

 

 

Track your progress

Track your progress

Trackers of different kinds are something a lot of people find very helpful in their BuJo. You can track lots of things…I will divide the trackers I have found into three different categories: How often, when, and progress.

How often

Some things I just want to know how often I do, some things I really want to do more often, and some things I just want to start doing. Trackers can be for a week or for a month, or even a whole year. My latest “how often”-tracker is about training, and looks like this:

When

Some things happen now and then, and I want to keep track of when and how often to see a pattern. It can be fears, certain behaviours, or physical things like when your female dog is in heat. For me, it’s scratchy ears. Midori has an allergy problem, and I like to know how often she gets itchy in order to see if what I do work or not. I also keep track of Valles “grumpy evenings” to see if there’s a pattern to what he did earlier that day or the day before. Tracking makes it easier to see cause and effect.

Progress

This is the one I use the most in dog training! I like to make “projects” of my goals, break them down into small goals, and track how we get better and better. It also helps me to figure out the next step in our training and keep the goal in sight.

I can do this for BIG projects, like my parkour-stuff (the instructor tracker is now fully filled out by the way!):

I can make it for smaller projects, like teaching a new trick (I really like the stairs!):

And yesterday I made one to get an overview of different aspects of a trick:

The main thing is that I choose a form that helps me, and for me, it’s important that I clearly see the end goal and can track if we’re getting closer. Sometimes I write the goal down (if I don’t have a clear vision this usually helps), sometimes it’s enough that I have an image in my head.

Sometimes I just need to get something done, and then I can make a progress-tracker that looks like this:

It’s only a matter of doing the work, and it feels good to see that I’m making progress 🙂

I usually mark the page in some way to make it easy to find again and check in every other week. Washi is perfect for that. Or a paperclip.

Got more ideas? I sure hope so, this should be different for everyone! Do what YOU need.

And if trackers don’t work for you, you can always play with a tennis ball instead! (Greetings from Midori…)

 

 

 

 

 

Dog training tip: rebounds

Dog training tip: rebounds

Rebounds, or “jump on a wall” is an impressive dogparkour trick (at least I think so!). It looks like this (not my dog, film from Youtube, have no idea who it is. It’s well done though!):

We started our training a few days ago, but as I thought about it I realised that we actually started our training when we started training “slam” (front paws up), paw target, jump up on things, “around” (run from me, around an object, and back). The knowledge of all these things helps her to learn to rebound.

There are some different ways to teach this, I chose to do it like this:

A simple layout. I started with the goal, to make sure I know – really KNOW, what I want the end behaviour to look like.

I started with the goal, to make sure I know – really KNOW, what I want the end behaviour to look like.

Then I listed knowledge she already has that I think will help her, that way we can repeat them a few times to have them fresh in her mind.

I did my “steps of criteria” starting at the lowest step. I may have to add some steps.

The hardest part was to find an obstacle. I chose to use something that could start at a lower angle and then gradually raise it until it’s parallel to the wall, and then move the behaviour to other walls, stones, or whatever surface. A rock maybe? A board against the wall? My eye fell on an old lid for our well. It’s big, heavy, and in concrete = a good surface. And it’s movable. I used the wife-card and went to my hubby…”Please, can you move the lid to a 45-degree angle? It’s too heavy for me…” (That means “I’m too lazy to do it”, and we both know it. But he usually plays along, because he’s very nice.)

We started off with repetition of “slam”, added a bit of distance, and she did that beautifully with speed and in both directions (IMPORTANT to train both sides!). How to get those back paws up…? I told her to jump up, and then directly rewarded jumping down – the same movement as before but added back paws. She didn’t quite get it…I started clicking back paws and made sure she had a lot of speed. Yes! One time…two times…three times…change direction!

About ten minutes of training time is definitely enough. This is an explosive movement (that’s why I used washi-tape with fireworks, to remind me that it can be dangerous if not controlled), and the dog needs a good warm-up and a good slowing-down after. And a bit of massage is never wrong.

Next day I let her do other things and exercise different muscles, to make sure she wouldn’t get sore.

And yesterday, she did perfect 45-degree rebounds! She is the Best Kelpie In The World…<3

The next step is to film it, increase distance, move the lid gradually to 90 degrees, and then move the behaviour. We named it “flip”.

Never been so happy to have been refused!

Never been so happy to have been refused!

I sent in my videos for DogParkour level B last week, and yesterday I got refused. And I’m really happy about it! Sounds strange? Let me explain:

I am an average dog trainer. Certainly not bad, but not nearly as good as the best. Part of this is because I tend to get sloppy – I keep food in my hand instead of in my pocket, my cues are unclear for both me and my dog, I have no plan and just play by ear (NOT a good strategy if I want results!). Not as much when I train for competition, but when we just “play-train” for fun.

And that is a bit how I have done my films for the title (so far): I know what the film is supposed to show, but I haven’t done my best to really show what we can do – I have just made the film. And that is exactly the feedback I got (not in those words, a bit nicer!). I am not training at my best, and it does not look as fluent and precise as it should do. As I know we CAN do!

I. Am. So. Pleased. Instead of thinking “oh no, I missed it!”, I find myself thinking “Thank god I get to redo it, and do it right this time!”

Instead of thinking “oh no, I missed it!”, I find myself thinking “Thank god I get to redo it, and do it right this time!” This means more training, more planning, and really having to step up my game to the next level and THINK about how I train. And that leads to becoming a better trainer!

I have already done my spread for the champion and superior levels, and there are LOTS of things we need to train. SUCH FUN! I did a Dutch door design, that makes it really easy to get a good overview. And I added a checkbox for “approved” (maybe I should have to for “film” in case I need to remake…Oh well, I’ll manage!)

But first, I need to remake a few films for level B and level C and send in work I am proud of instead of just making the films as fast as possible.

I really like her attitude and willingness in this film, that shows sex different behaviours to do with one obstacle. No food in my hands, clear cues, and I had a plan BEFORE I started 🙂

Dog training tip: jump between!

Dog training tip: jump between!

As Midori and I proceed in our Parkour training, it gets harder and harder. One thing I have noticed is that she lacks understanding of “jump from one object to the next without landing on the ground inbetween”. And I can understand her, I mean why wouldn’t she take the “easy way”?

So I had to think about how to train this. I made a simple plan, listed three levels for us to train, and also thought about what will be a bit challenging for me:

I don’t think it’s the training plan that will make all the difference (let’s face it, it’s very basic), but the fact that I took the time to think about a training plan, and the effort to write it down in a way that someone else can (I hope so anyway) understand. THAT makes a difference. And I got some new ideas to try! Think. Plan.

Think. Plan. What’s your goal? Write it down. Break it down. Make tasks of it. Review.

Now it’s time to create (train), and then repeat the process all over again – and make adjustments if needed as we go along.

It will be FUN! (Want to join me? That would be awesome! Tell me about your success!)

Bullet Journal dog training plan: front paws up!

Bullet Journal dog training plan: front paws up!

One of the first things I taught Midori when she was a puppy, was to put her paws on a pot and circle with her hind legs. I did that to teach her multiple things: interact with a (metal) object, learn the shaping game, use her paws, balance, strength, get to know her back end, and it is a good movement in obedience training.

She looked like this (12 weeks old):

Now, when we are training Parkour, the behaviour resurfaces as “front paws up” and is a really easy and fun behaviour to train. But how do you start?

To help you out, I made a spread in my Bullet Journal Feel free to steal my ideas!

I started with the goal. What does it look like? Then an inventory: does my dog need any prior knowledge? After that: what equipment do I need?

Then I made a step by step description and made checkboxes. For my dog, step three is not necessary – but that depends on how you train!

On the other page, I made a tracker for seven days. This is an easy trick, and training ten minutes every day gets you a long way. I made it a mood-tracker, to measure how fun the training has been. And I left space for comments.

I like to have my training plan “at a glance” without all the text, so I made a staircase. I like the staircase, it’s a bit symbolic and it’s easy to put in more steps if necessary. For each step we are one step closer to the goal, and I get to draw a star (because my dog is a star). Also room for comments.

And then I end it with some ideas of how to keep working with the “front paws up”-trick.

We have actually trained all of these. Midoris favourite is the last one: close cabinets!

I would love to know if this was helpful to you, if you got any new ideas for training your dog or for a spread in your BuJo!

And if you haven’t started planning your dog training – your BuJo is the perfect place for it! Haven’t got one? Don’t know how to start?

Join my FREE e-course!

(And…it’s a perfect trick for cute photos!)

 

 

Review – why is it important in dog training, and how to do it BuJo-style!

Review – why is it important in dog training, and how to do it BuJo-style!

I currently work on my and Midoris DogParkour-skills, and we are getting a lot of progress. Part of this is because she is well trained in the “basics” to begin with, she knows the “rules” of training, she has a good awareness of her body and paws, and she loves to train. But part of it is actually me: my ability to use that big frontal lobe of mine and figure out how to break the exercise down into small pieces to make her understand what I want her to do. I’m good at making training plans, and I’m good at knowing when to stick with the plan and when to alter it.

Part of this is because she is well trained in the “basics” to begin with, she knows the “rules” of training (listen for the marker, repeat, develop), she has a good awareness of her body and paws, and she loves to train.

But part of it is actually me: my ability to use that big frontal lobe of mine and figure out how to break the exercise down into small pieces to make her understand what I want her to do. Of course, that has some to do with experience – I know her pretty well after four years of daily training – but this week I have trained two dogs that I don’t know as well and it’s also been very successful. And yes, I’m an OK dog trainer who knows how behaviour works, but that’s not all. It’s much simpler: I’m good at making training plans, and I’m good at knowing when to stick with the plan and when to alter it. How? Because I’m good at the review!

Let me walk you through the process:

  1. I want to train something new: I set my goal.
  2. What does it look like? What is the dog supposed to do with her body? I am very concrete and precise. That makes the next step so much easier.
  3. I make a plan. I start with where we are now, end with the goal behaviour, and I break the road from here to there down into as many small steps as I can.
  4. I write this down, with checkboxes, to always know where we are at. And I leave space for even more steps (sometimes that space is just in my head, but it’s there). This is my training plan, part of my “roadmap”. I can put in trackers to measure how many times we train every week, how many sessions a specific step needs, or my success rate during a session (out of ten tries I want her to do about 8 correct and 2 incorrect if it’s not the end behaviour). Or I can write notes after each session, telling me how it went and what to think about. Or both.
  5. I review. Most of the time briefly before every session, but every week at least! Do I follow my plan? What boxes can be checked? Do I need more steps somewhere? Do I need a new plan entirely?

Think. Plan. Create. Repeat. The key to success!

Today I reviewed my Dog Parkour spread (not really a training plan, but a still a roadmap), and it now looks like this:

It’s very satisfying to see how we are getting better, and I’m getting closer to my goal! Plus: I always know the next step.

So…that is my advice for today. Make a plan. Write it down. Work on it. Make sure you work on it by reviewing it as often as you need to. And if you get stuck – change it.

These are the two other dogs I have been working with, by the way:

And if you want to see some Creative Kelpie moves, look here at some of our films for Level B: